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© 2019 by Anatomy of Movement

EXPERIENCING A KEY STRUCTURE OF THE BODY AND ITS ROLE IN THE YOGA ASANA PRACTICE

20 Hours

Lower Limbs & Yoga

Based on the 40+ years of research, practice and publication work of the international Anatomy of Movement® school founded by Blandine Calais Germain, this methodology today counts as a leading resource available for movement professionals.

Equipped with the unparalleled attention to detail and comprehensive emphasis on research and experiential learning that characterizes all Anatomy of Movement® trainings,

Wellco Yoga Anatomy courses provide a thorough, structured and analysis-based insight into yoga anatomy— empowering teachers to lead exceptional classes that are sustainable and precision-led.

Serving as partner and international hub for the Anatomy of Movement school,

Wellco organizes specialized trainings for a vast range of movement professionals

year round and is now making the method's in-depth teachings for yoga available

in a condensed, English language format (taught with Spanish option).

Facilitated by one of the most senior teachers of the method trained by Blandine

Calais-Germain herself, this course will impart analysis-based

knowledge for yoga teachers who are ready to take their professional

work to the next level.


 

DATES:

16,17h of May 2020

 

DURATION:

20 hours
 

PRACTICAL INFORMATION:

20h workshop - 14h in person + 6h online


 

TIMES:

Sat - 10.00-19.30

Sun - 9.00-17.30


 

LOCATION:

International AoM Hub Barcelona,

Spain


 

COST:

€280

 

CONTACT:

info@anatomyofmovement.com 

+34 625 207 802

PRESENTATION:

The hip is a key joint within the practice of numerous yoga postures. The well-being of the neighboring regions of the hip (knee, spine, particularly lumbar) often depends on the ease of their movements.

 

Trapped between the needs of the hip and the foot that joins the lower limb with the floor, the knee, intermediate joint of the lower limb, is sometimes "taken hostage" in the practice of yoga postures.

 

This course proposes to evaluate all the parameters that can cause a knee to be in a risky or protected situation during yoga practice, and to draw practical consequences. It also invites us to observe all the positions that are suited to the hip joint or that imply a re-balancing of one position to the other.

 

This workshop allows us to take stock of all the parameters that can lead a hip to be more or less flexible and the consequences within the practice of yoga.

 

In this workshop we will observe the foot and ankle in two important situations that we encounter in two key types of asanas:

-some sitting postures that require great flexibility but should never over-stretch the ligaments

-standing postures, which require to build a very stable support (called the tripod of the foot)

 

 

GOALS:

In this course we will discover:

  • The structure of the hip: bone, joints.

  • The key muscles by mobilizing or stabilizing the hip and observe its action in the context of certain postures.

  • Normal and abnormal movements of the knee and the means of protecting oneself in the postures (adaptations of movements, preparation exercises, use of material, oral instructions).

  • The femorotibial and femororotulian knee: bone, joints.

  • The muscles by mobilizing or stabilizing the knee and observe its action in a yoga session as a student or teacher.

  • Normal and abnormal movements of the knee and the means to protect oneself in asana practice (adaptation of movements, preparatory exercises, use of material to help the movement, oral indications during class).

  • The bone structure of the foot and the bones of the ankle. Know the main joints of the foot and the ankle joint.

  • Mobilities of the different floors of the foot and observation in the context of asanas. Becoming familiar with terms that refer to foot movements in different orientations.

  • Hyper- or hypo- mobile regions and the means to protect them in the postures (adaptations of movements, exercises of preparation, use of materials, oral instructions).

  • How to stabilize and re-balance the support of the foot according to each posture.

 

 

TEACHING TOOLS USED IN OUR YOGA ANATOMY WORKSHOPS:

  • Anatomical models.

  • Availability of atlas or anatomy poster.

  • Installation of certain skeletal elements in the models.

  • Selective coloring of anatomical drawings.

  • Wall images that show regions, movements or postures.

  • Thematic powerpoint presentations, videos or articles from Blandine Calais-Germain and her team of teachers when available.

  • Practice by two or three people in movement, with correction among students, supervised by the teacher.

 

THEMATIC MANUAL THAT CONTAINS:

  • Course program

  • Drawings to consult, complete or color.

  • Original AoM texts for in-depth study

 

 

PROGRAM:

 

This workshop will alternate between the following components:

Analysis to allow observing and knowing the anatomy of the hip: bone forms, joint structures, deep and superficial muscles.

 

Practical segments of movement that detail a type of posture, and allow to introduce in a progressive way notions of analysis.

 

Instruction times during which postures are explored and modified.

 

For selected key positions, certain following questions will be addressed:

 

  • What is the hip movement that occurs?

  • How will hip movement, if deficient, be involuntarily relieved and "mimicked" by other parts of the body?

  • What are the factors that intensify its amplitude? (intra or extra-corporal forces).

  • Does movement occur with a load on the hip at different times of the posture?

  • What are the factors that eventually intensify this burden?

  • Are there any risks to the hip, lumbar spine or knee?

  • What provisions can we introduce to prevent them?

  • How to eventually prepare the posture, sometimes well in advance?

  • Reading of the posture to distinguish what is done specifically by the knee or by the neighboring joints.

  • What is the movement of the knee that occurs?

  • How will hip movement, if deficient, be involuntarily relieved and "mimicked" by other parts of the body?

  • What are the factors that increase its amplitude? (Intra or extra-corporal forces).

  • Does the movement occur with a load on the knee at different moments of the posture?

  • What are the factors that eventually intensify this burden?

  • Are there any risks for the hip, lumbar spine or foot?

  • What provisions can we introduce to prevent them?

  • How to prepare the posture eventually, sometimes well in advance?